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bright blooms 3

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The simple things in life - like daisies. A very old friend of mine posted this on her FB page today and I thought it so worth reading I have borrowed it as is. The original post is by Anthony Harris.

"I asked one of my friends who has crossed 60 & is heading to 70 what sort of change he is feeling in him?
He sent me the following very interesting lines, which I would like to share with you ....
1) After loving my parents, my siblings, my spouse, my children, my friends, now I have started loving myself.
2) I just realised that I am not “Atlas”. The world does not rest on my shoulders.
3) I now stopped bargaining with vegetables & fruits vendors. A few Rands more is not going to burn a hole in my pocket but it might help the poor fellow save for his daughter’s school fees.
4) I pay the petrol attendant a big tip. The extra money might bring a smile to his face. He is toiling much harder for a living than me
5) I stopped telling the elderly that they've already narrated that story many times. The story makes them walk down the memory lane & relive the past.
6) I have learnt not to correct people even when I know they are wrong. The onus of making everyone perfect is not on me. Peace is more precious than perfection.
7) I give compliments freely & generously. Compliments are mood enhancer not only for the recipient, but also for me.
8) I have learnt not to bother about a crease or a spot on my shirt. Personality speaks louder than appearances.
9) I walk away from people who don't value me. They might not know my worth, but I do.
10) I remain cool when someone plays dirty politics to outrun me in the rat race. I am not a rat & neither am I in any race.
11) I am learning not to be embarrassed by my emotions. It’s my emotions that make me human.
12) I have learned that its better to drop the ego than to break a relationship. My ego will keep me aloof whereas with relationships I will never be alone.
13) I have learnt to live each day as if it's the last. After all, it might be the last.
14) I am doing what makes me happy. I am responsible for my happiness, and I owe it to myself.
I decided to send this to all my friends. Why do we have to wait to be 60 or 70, why can't we practice this at any stage and age....✨"

Enjoy the simple things in life dear friends.

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Woodowly

Your local bakery sounds delicious. In the sticky bun line my downfall is Chelsea buns crammed full of raisins and sticky cinnamon with gooey white icing on top. I have had to give them up since I was diagnosed as diabetic last year. Local usage of language and phrases is a fun area. We have 11 official languages so we have a tremendous cross over of slang, pronunciations and emphases of words. So we Eish (Shoo, that's bad!) Eina (Flip that's sore!), Voetsek or just 'Tsek (Bugger off!) used for a dog or a politician and Halala (for free!) whether our home language is English, Afrikaans, Xhosa or Zulu amongst others. I think I lost my way in that last sentence! Keep well.

Emmergee

British vs. American English is not a problem for me, Jayne, although the only "spelt" in my life IS that ancient grain. There is a local bakery here through which I was introduced to spelt as an ingredient in their breads and (my downfall) sticky buns.
The pronouns which drive me crazy here are subjects used as objects, and vice versa. "Her and I went on vacation." Or "Me and my friends were hanging out."
The use of adjectives as adverbs is another no-no in my world. My son made me VERY proud many years ago. He'd had an appendectomy and was coming out of anaesthesia when his wife at the time called a friend and said Robbie was "doing good." He, in his half-drugged state, turned to me and whispered, "well." I can't explain why, but it reminded me of that nodding severed head in "Mikado" - but again I digress.
All around me here are property signs which use apostrophes in their plurals. The sign says "The Smith's" --- and you KNOW there is more than one Smith on that farm.
I just looked at the weather for Cape Town (is that where you are?) and your Thursday and Friday forecasts are my idea of perfect weather days! I hope you get outside in that weather for me. I can live without fresh puzzles every day. Maybe.

Woodowly

Well, I can understand that weakness very well MG. I' a teacher (of English) so it's ingrained to correct errors and in my first job I did a lot of proof reading of magazine articles so it is automatic to pick up errors and want to correct them. I do quite a lot of moderation of assessments and my colleagues say I even pick up if there is a comma or full stop missing! Errors are like an itch that must be scratched - they annoy me I must be honest but, at the same time, I have great sympathy for second language speakers and writers of English - it's a horrible language to learn, so many exceptions, weird spellings, words that aren't pronounced like they are spelt/spelled, words that sound the same, but mean different things and are spelt differently or those that are spelt ( past tense spelled and an ancient type of wheat, for e.g.) the same but mean different things depending on the context. Ack!!! One can't blame people for errors.

The most common errors amongst my students are:

filled for filed
writting instead of writing
bussary instead of bursary
muddling up pronouns - he and she in particular
pubic instead of public!

I do have to smile at some of the funnies that come on my desk.

The pedantic and inveterate corrector of spelling and grammar errors, Jayne

Emmergee

#6 is my only occasional downfall. But I'm working on that, too. It's tough - I grew up in a family when errors were quickly, if not unkindly, corrected. It was how we learned, aside from formal classes, of course. On Facebook these days, I'll find myself making a correction..... and then erasing the comment before posting it. Baby steps. Hope you have a lovely Tuesday, Jayne!

Woodowly

Thanks you so much Lorna and Cumeragh. I love the line Peace is more precious than perfection. Stay peaceful today! Jayne

These are wise words, put things back into perspective.

goingsilver

Lovely puzzle and wise words. Thanks Jayne.

Woodowly

Thanks Donna, It was a fun one to solve I thought too. Jayne

qtpie831

Love the beautiful flowers enjoyed working it,
Thanks! Donna