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Holywood Maypole, NI

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Trenchman

Very kind of you B&P, and very nice if the "pleasing" were true! My aim is like everyone else's in that I put up what I think might be humorous/interesting/ difficult enough for people to enjoy.
I've just uploaded another three of places in Holywood - not brilliant, but time will tell if they have any appeal.
As a matter of interest, the maypole is the only one in the entire island of Ireland!
Thank you for your interesting comment.

BooksAndPuzzles

Lots of interesting information there -- I especially appreciate the overlap between general history and real lives! And as far as I'm concerned, Jigidi is a place where people can participate in their own way to a large extent... sometimes there's accompanying info, and sometimes it's just "a picture is worth a thousand words." ;) For some people it can vary from day to day (Example: often, I just solve puzzles; sometimes I comment. And at some point, I may even post puzzles!)
I think what I'm trying to say is, whatever you bring to Jigidi, @Trenchman , I'm sure it will please a bunch of people.

Trenchman

I'll see if I can put another couple of photos of Holywood.

Trenchman

@bevpuzzler8 and @BooksAnd Puzzles
I never expected to receive any comments on this photo, but all is good.Thans for all the comments. Normally I would give some form of information with an upload, but O didn't think on this occasion that anyone would be interested.
Holywood was first visited ny King John in the 11th century. The moanstery wasa set up but had long gone before my time. I did however, spend many happy hours in both the grounds and on the motte within, as they were directly across the road from our house.
The original Maypole was a gift from the sea captain of a ship that sank just offshore during the 1800's. It was a "Thank you" to the people who helped in the rescue It was replaced circa 1954 due to rot, and replaced again twice since then. I'm sure I uploaded a closer photo of it a few years ago.
I think it was in 1953 that my sister joined with other Holywood girls in what has been an annual May Princess dance around the maypole, the last time until it started again several years ago.
There is also what locals call the Martello Tower, but which was actually a watchtower of uncertain age, but probably dating back to the 1600's.
The local bus used to take twenty minutes to Belfast, but new faster roads make the journey longer (modernisation doesn't always improve things)!!!
The town is now better known for at least one its citizens - international golfer Rory McIlroy. It was also the home of Rosalind Praeger, who sculpted several figurines that are now in some US museum; and Rowell Friars, a well-known Ulster muralist.
It was also a prominent Garrison town for a great many years until recently, when many such garrisons were closed due to government cuts.
Once a one-horse town, Holywood is now a favoured place to live by the wealthy! From the low hills there are splendid views of the Belfast Lough, with up to 120 cruise ships visiting Belfast City every year. Holywood is only two miles from Belfast Harbour.
Every year during the 50's and 60's there were sailing regattas every Sunday, although I'm not certain they still exist, but we used to watch them as children.

BooksAndPuzzles

@bevpuzzler8 -- Jigidiers get to learn something new from the Wikipedia information you post! ;-)

@Trenchman -- I really enjoyed your photo and learning about this place... And what a view down the street! :-)

bevpuzzler8

We learn somenting everyday. Take care my friends. 6=10-23

BooksAndPuzzles

I don't think I've ever heard "horses for courses" but growing up with horses (and having to learn all kinds of things about horses for 4H club), I knew of the actual concept! American Quarter Horses, with their powerful hindquarters, may be fast for short distances, but they're not as fast as leaner Thoroughbreds for longer races... and Arabian horses are known for having the best endurance for LONG distance rides!

BooksAndPuzzles

@Trenchman Well, you learn something new every day, and thanks to you I had to look this up:

horses for courses - "different people are suited to different things or situations.
The earliest recorded instance of this expression, in A. E. T. Watson's Turf ( 1891 ), suggests its origin: ‘A familiar phrase on the turf is “horses for courses”…the Brighton Course is very like Epsom, and horses that win at one meeting often win at the other’.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017"

horses for courses (British English) - "people or things should only be used for the purpose which they are most suitable for: I think Johnson would be much better for this job. It’s a question of horses for courses.
This expression refers to the fact that horses race better on a track that suits them.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017"

--two of the entries at:
https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/horses+for+courses

bevpuzzler8

😊😉👍

Trenchman

No offence, no problem, no worries!

I'm still a biker at 76, but I don't know of anyone who actually names their bike!
Harley's are quite popular in some UK & Irish circles, but they are not suited to our roads, are too noisy, and are not generally reliable....but it's horses for courses as we say!

bevpuzzler8

Sorry, I am the goofy American here. No offense ...Right?

Trenchman

Slight correction bevp, I'm Ulster Scots (British), not Irish. It made no difference in a small community like Holywood. In Victorian times it was a spa town; today it is a bistro town and one of the most expensive places to live in Northern Ireland.

bevpuzzler8

In America if you own a Harley Davidson bike, bikers call them Hogs.
does Northern Ireland have nicknames for their bikes? Just being nosy.

bevpuzzler8

OOPS BTW I got it all from Wikipedia.😉😊

bevpuzzler8

@Trenchman
Thank you for your kindness. I am not Irish but my sister in law was and I have two nieces that are Irish..I have never been out of the USA except twice to Canada. I was not a traveler, if I was I would have wanted to see Ireland and actually i am of Croatian decent. Bev. 4-28-23

Trenchman

Good girl, bevp! I was raised in the house behind that grey wall on the left, and that's my motorcycle on the right, I was visiting last September. If you're not a Holywood girl, tou should be with your excellent knowledge.

bevpuzzler8

If the info. is not to your liking I shall remove it. 4-28-23
@Trenchman

bevpuzzler8

Holywood (/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud) (Irish: Ard Mhic Nasca, meaning 'Height of the Son of Nasca'. Latin: Sanctus Boscus, meaning 'Holy Wood'[2]) is a town in the metropolitan area of Belfast in County Down, Northern Ireland. It is a civil parish and townland of 755 acres lying on the shore of Belfast Lough, between Belfast and Bangor. Holywood Exchange and Belfast City Airport are nearby. The town hosts an annual jazz and blues festival.

Toponymy
The English name Holywood comes from Latin Sanctus Boscus 'holy wood'. This was the name the Normans gave to the woodland surrounding the monastery of St Laiseran, son of Nasca. The monastery was founded by Laiseran before 640 and was on the site of the present Holywood Priory. The earliest Anglicised form appears as Haliwode in a 14th-century document.[3]

The Irish name for Holywood is Ard Mhic Nasca meaning "high ground of Mac Nasca".[4][5]

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