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"Keanu" kitten in do-rag and gold chain

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Above: the star of the hilarious comedy "Keanu" by Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele.


Some things I learned from reading a cat magazine while waiting at CVS last night:


1. Studies show that cats are day-dreaming when they stare into space. Because their brains are quite similar to humans', despite being smaller and with far fewer neurons, scientists were able to recognize the same mind-wandering as in human brains. They can only speculate as to the content: the next meal, a game to play, or cuddling with their humans are all possibilities.

2. Whiskers are also known as:

a) Cilia
b) Palpae
c) Vibrissae
d) Feline antennae
e) Touchy-feelies
z) Inferior to sloth whiskers

3. https://www.musicforcats.com/ is the home-page for David Teie's "Music for Cats: Music Developed For Feline Ears."
"David Teie, a soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra, recently teamed up with animal scientists to develop 'Music for Cats,' a series of whirring, lilting and at times squeaky musical tracks designed for cats' brains and ears." His compositions have received commendations from scientists and, it is reported, genuine pleasure from cats. (My Rocket kitty certainly perked up his ears.)

4. Feline and human brains differ by magnitudes, but not always in kind. Experts say that both species are excellent at gleaning cues from body language and vocal utterances.

5. Cats don't automatically understand the human smile as an expression, but given the opportunity, they learn that it is a friendly signal and perhaps that something nice is about to happen. While we inherit smiling and laughing, cats have to spend time studying the whole body language package, and many learn to smile, too. (This might merely be, in some cats, the same physical conformation that makes dolphins look like they're smiling. Personally, from experience, I believe it's a learned behavior.)

6. They like catnip because of its aroma -- it reminds them of the smells of, shall we say, courtship. This is why cats too young to have entered sexual maturity are not interested in it.

7. Cats like to hear their names, repeated as frequently as one can throughout the day. What I've always wondered is whether they recognize the sound as a *symbol* that represents them, or whether they merely associate it with food or petting. My cats will generally come when called, but it isn't fool-proof.
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msbonne

3 - no
4 - yes
5 - no
6 - yes
7- no

Mischka

I knocked off my answer too quickly, earlier.

3. "The other music they thoroughly enjoy is Jingle Bells by the meowing cats."

This rings the faintest of bells ... Do you have a link?

4. "Which is to say that people usually know when they will get bitten or scratched by a cat. They also know when a cat is, well, asleep, awake, etc... Cats know when people are most vulnerable (asleep), and often take advantage of this time..."

Okay, on THAT level there can be no argument. While I was taking the dainty approach to "tells" in cat behavior, you have strong-armed straight to the point that bedevils us all.

"Sir, I don't disagree on any particular point," as Zoe said to Mal, in "Serenity."

5. I am sure you've spoken with Flipper, but THIS dolphin seems to disagree:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rynvewVe21Y

Please, Hoff, I know that sloths rank on the Cuteness Scale at 9.75 aws, but you have to give us an aws rating for this bit of cross-species communication.


6. I'll go off an a tangent. Anyone who has a cat, and knows that cats like catnip, is an a-hole if they don't provide said catnip.


7. "They want to hear their name at least 50 times or more before they will respond."

And I'm willing to do that. Who isn't?

msbonne

My pleasure. I enjoyed the banter with the pussies.

jimez

I really like Kit Kat's. :)

Mischka

Good to know you speak Cat. Thanks for the annotations. :-D

msbonne

1. Studies show that cats are day-dreaming when they stare into space. Because their brains are quite similar to humans', despite being smaller and with far fewer neurons, scientists were able to recognize the same mind-wandering as in human brains. They can only speculate as to the content: the next meal, a game to play, or cuddling with their humans are all possibilities.
- This has been proven when they hired a certain Master Ninja sloth (who speaks cat), to assist with their studies.

2. Whiskers are also known as:

a) Cilia
b) Palpae
c) Vibrissae
d) Feline antennae
e) Touchy-feelies
z) Inferior to sloth whiskers
- While ANY whickers are inferior to sloth whiskers, being the humble creatures that we are (especially me), we do not brag about how fantastic ours are.

3. https://www.musicforcats.com/ is the home-page for David Teie's "Music for Cats: Music Developed For Feline Ears."
"David Teie, a soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra, recently teamed up with animal scientists to develop 'Music for Cats,' a series of whirring, lilting and at times squeaky musical tracks designed for cats' brains and ears." His compositions have received commendations from scientists and, it is reported, genuine pleasure from cats. (My Rocket kitty certainly perked up his ears.)
- The other music they thoroughly enjoy is Jingle Bells by the meowing cats.

4. Feline and human brains differ by magnitudes, but not always in kind. Experts say that both species are excellent at gleaning cues from body language and vocal utterances.
- Which is to say that people usually know when they will get bitten or scratched by a cat. They also know when a cat is, well, asleep, awake, etc... Cats know when people are most vulnerable (asleep), and often take advantage of this time to have a party, or sit upon the humans chest and suck the soul out of them.

5. Cats don't automatically understand the human smile as an expression, but given the opportunity, they learn that it is a friendly signal and perhaps that something nice is about to happen. While we inherit smiling and laughing, cats have to spend time studying the whole body language package, and many learn to smile, too. (This might merely be, in some cats, the same physical conformation that makes dolphins look like they're smiling. Personally, from experience, I believe it's a learned behavior.)
- Whilst talking with Flipper, he told me to never believe a smiling cat. I have taken his sage advice and always heeded it.

6. They like catnip because of its aroma -- it reminds them of the smells of, shall we say, courtship. This is why cats too young to have entered sexual maturity are not interested in it.
- Cats like catnip. That is indeed a revelation, who knew?

7. Cats like to hear their names, repeated as frequently as one can throughout the day. What I've always wondered is whether they recognize the sound as a *symbol* that represents them, or whether they merely associate it with food or petting. My cats will generally come when called, but it isn't fool-proof.
- That is also the reason most of them do NOT come when you call them. They want to hear their name at least 50 times or more before they will respond.

porcellus2

sweet little kitten

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