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Robin in a tree

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Taken May 4, 2022
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WhiskersNFeathers

I don't need it all the time. I ordered my new mattress this morning, never ordered online before but it has great recommendations and a 100 days trial. I have to wait now a couple of weeks maybe less. If it suits me, I'll be doing much better.

joyfulli

My mom had an electric wheelchair, Mila. I think Medicare paid for it.

WhiskersNFeathers

Sometimes I would like to have one of those electric wheelchairs. Caregivers, that is a noble thing to do. We still don't have definite plans. It worries me.

joyfulli

Your access to your house sounds similar to ours, but with one exception: In addition to the stairs leading to our front door, we have a ramp. Years ago, before his first wife died, Cary and she were adult foster caregivers. They had to accommodate people in wheelchairs. So I get to use the ramp instead of the steps. Our access through the garage to the kitchen is very difficult for me, too.

WhiskersNFeathers

I have to admit that since the year Mrs Wren had her nest in my wreath, when spring arrives I put something different on my door not appropriate for nests, all the way into fall. As beautiful as it was (it was an honor), I couldn't let it go on. My arthritis got worse with all the garden work... our other door is from the garage into the kitchen and the steps are treacherous, only two but very high (I am sure not up to code) and covered on bricks. Is I fall there, it would not be without consequences. The two steps to the front door are low and very easy on me. Opening the door frequently that year wasn't easy and most of the time used the garage entrance. They always find another suitable place.

joyfulli

It was a nest right next to our front door, Mila. My husband took it down, against my protests. He also took down the wreath that had supported it. I will miss it.
Things like that happen, Sylvia. Don't worry too much!! :-)

lovesgulls

Very strange, I missed the last 2 photos from the day before...doing them now. Maybe I was interrupted and never got back. I can't remember and this worries me, lol!

WhiskersNFeathers

Yes! Do you still have the nest by the door... can't remember if it was the front or back door... or I have the wrong friend?

joyfulli

Thanks, Jillian. They are probably one of America's favorite birds.
I completely forgot that the female robins weren't as brightly colored as the males. I certainly knew that most females are quite drab compared to their male counterparts. That's so they're safer when nesting.
It's been so wonderful to have sunshine the past couple of days, GG. It inspires me to get out!

bowlakeboy

All four photos are first rate, Li. Impressive!!

GOSPELGRANDMA

This is my favorite for today, Li! Beautiful shot of the bird, and I LOVE the pine needles and blue sky. Just gorgeous!! ☺

WhiskersNFeathers

The females are supposed to have extra space for when they "prepare" the eggs, but females do not have those vibrant colors. There are very few birds that male and female are exact same colors; ie. Bluejays and Mockingbirds come to mind. Not all bird books are precise.

JillianB

Beautiful bird and photo. Thank you Li

joyfulli

It always seems to me that the robins are more plump here in the spring. I don't know that much about robin anatomy, but I wonder if the females are more plump before laying her eggs? Good question, Mila.

WhiskersNFeathers

Is there a western Robin? This guy looks cutter and more plump than my visitors.
Though I should no doubt the magic you make with the camera! Great composition!

joyfulli

That's interesting, Sharon, at how your drier landscaping has limited the bird presence. I know I would miss that; I'm spoiled up here with such abundance of wildlife. I lie the fact that you can walk just two blocks or so to see natural desert. I'm sure that's pleasing. Interesting about the rosy faced lovebirds. They look like they'd be fun to have around.

Sharon72

To conserve water, a very large percentage of the Mesa neighborhoods are desert landscaped with crushed granite yards, maybe a patch of grass though nowadays it is likely to be artificial turf, and desert trees, plants, bushes. Few of the yards around me even have trees as the yards are small. We do have older neighborhoods with lush landscaping as when they were built they were designed to be irrigated every so often. In my neighborhood we do have green areas around the perimeter with grass and trees, designed as retention basins for water runoff when it rains and for play and dog walking. When home, I seldom see anything except a hawk or pigeons, though I do hear a woodpecker now and then. Mesa rose out of a desert and I can walk two blocks down to a huge block of land that's never been developed and it's all natural desert. In higher elevations of the state, the habitat is quite different and there would be more species of birds. Many years ago some rosy faced lovebirds escaped and they remained wild and built up their population. They congregated around the ASU library air conditioning vents, so I would enjoy seeing those each day coming or leaving work.

joyfulli

I decided to look them up, Sharon. AZ has both breeding and wintering areas for robins. They go even into Central America for wintering. Maybe some day you'll see one.

Sharon72

Perhaps in parts, but I've not seen any in my area.

joyfulli

Good memories, Sharon. I didn't realize they weren't prevalent in AZ.

Sharon72

Back in Minnesota I loved seeing them come back in the spring. I haven't seen one in years and years and miss them. Thanks for the puzzle and the memory.

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