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Northumberlandia Earth Sculpture, Cramlington, England

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55°05'18.2"N, 1°37'41.1"W

“Northumberlandia, or ‘Lady of the North,’ is a massive land sculpture in the shape of a reclining female figure near the town of Cramlington in northern England. Completed in 2012, the sculpture is made of 1.5 million metric tonnes of earth removed from the neighboring Shotton Surface Mine. It is 112 feet (34 m) high and 1,300 feet (400 m) long.”

Courtesy of Daily Overview

Google Street View near the head:
https://goo.gl/maps/DF4TuDD1vDL2

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Bill_I_Am

Happy to have entertained you, stunned. :-)

All you gentlemen are too much, I love how you are informative in a very cometic way. Lovely puzzle, thank you.

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

Flaming!

Bill_I_Am

Ah, so they are the culprits. The first AAS. Or should it be asses?

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

So have I, as I find all birds remarkable and captivating. I've watched in fascination as starling swarms did their murmurations on a number of occasions in my winter walkabouts at the Harriman campus in Albany. But I often wish that I could turn back the clock and beat some sense into the American Acclimatization Society of the late 19th century. They're the folks that sought to introduce every bird species mentioned in the Shakespeare's works here in the US, as an 'aesthetic goal'. Ahh, I've just got to let it go, I guess. They're all dead now, the starling's here to stay and there's far more important things to change given the chance to crusade back in time. "♩ ♪ ♫ This is my quest... ♩ ♪ ♫ "

Bill_I_Am

I have always enjoyed both crows and starlings, but I am not a farmer.

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

Or are you just so used to them that you just don't notice them any more, Alex? I don't know where you live, but from a small misguided introduction, the species has conquered the entire lower 48 US states along with most of North America. Sadly they have displaced many native species in the process. They are a seriously invasive species that continues to wreak havoc.
https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/eursta/introduction
https://nematode.unl.edu/starling.htm

iceng

Starlings used to be a problem years ago but now happily do not see any..

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

I'd say both, or opportunistic through their intelligence. They're fairly omnivorous, as anyone who ever seen them going at a 'squirrel road pizza' will realize. Along with foraging on food scraps and carrion they also hunt, taking any small critters they come across. I don't know that they are any more avaricious than other birds, but they are very difficult to fool or scare off. Starlings are a big problem as well, but more out of their sheer numbers.

Bill_I_Am

Are crows more opportunistic than other birds or just smarter and therefore more difficult to foil?

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

I can relate. I have rescued, cared for and released a young crow on two occasions, I hope successfully but who knows. I found them to be very intelligent animals who behaved very well while in captivity - very calm and receptive to feeding. It was a very enlightening experience. But they are very opportunistic regarding farm crops, so I can understand farmers needing to protect their crops.

Bill_I_Am

Oh, so it's a real thing. I had no idea. Thanks, but just reading your description is all I want to know about crow traps. :-[

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

@Bill_I_Am @iceng Bill and Alex, although I have not yet figured out how it pertains to the story line, an actual crow trap is encountered by one of the characters in the book. Apparently they are not uncommon in English farm country and quite effective. They are large and almost entirely screened in with chicken wire, save for the central 'ladder' opening down the middle of the top portion of the trap. Once placed in the open and baited with some animal carcass, crows are drawn to the trap and enter it via the opening in the ladder section. These opening a large enough that a crow can easily drop down into the enclosure, but then they are trapped inside because the opening are too small for them to fly through! Other, smaller traps (Larsen traps) use a live crow called a 'Judas crow' as a lure to entice other crows to enter a trap, since they are very territorial. This is the type that occurs in the book, and I suspect it will be a metaphor for the outcome of the story... The video is 13 minutes long but kind of interesting. The image is that of a Larsen trap.
https://youtu.be/g7a-NeDTaL4
https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-a-crow-trap-with-a-judas-crow-and-a-victim-often-called-larsen-or-56125759.html
There a lot more about this on the web, just search on 'crow traps'. Mind you, much of it is unpleasant...

Bill_I_Am

Haha, no, sorry. Andy (LarryTheCrashTestDummy) said below he was reading the book and that it was set in this same location.

iceng

*--* thank you,
I thought it was a geographic reference :-/

Bill_I_Am

Here's a preview, Alex. But it won't help with your crows. :-[

https://books.google.com/books?id=Y1u7DAAAQBAJ&lpg=PP1&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

iceng

While I feed Crows, they can be a bother and I'm curious about a "Crow Trap" ?

Bill_I_Am

What a cool coinky-dink, that this sculpture and local mining legacy intersect with The Crow Trap! And you have a good eye for form, which is reminiscent of the apsaras of Hindu and Buddhist myth, and which I remember fondly from Sigiriya in Sri Lanka.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/26849514@N06/31815140803

LarryTheCrashTestDummy

Hubba hubba, I really dig those curves! ;-D Interesting, for me anyway. This is located smack dab in the middle of the setting for the mystery I'm currently reading - "The Crow Trap" by Ann Cleeves. What really strikes a chord with this puzzle is that it centers around a proposed mining quarry and the potential impact it might have on the community. That, and a few folks get offed - it is a mystery after all. I know, I know, another novel. Tsk... Anyway, I guess that it's good that they did something aesthetically positive to help offset the adjacent blight on the earth, but... The form reminds me of some of the artistic styles of southern Asia, like India or Thailand. Thanks Bill.