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Violet Cuckoo

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Small, sluggish cuckoo, more often heard than seen; listen for the male’s explosive descending trills and a loud but unremarkable “chom-wit!”, often given in flight. Adult male glossy purple with white-barred belly. Female greenish-brown above with curvier, paler barring extending up to the face; juvenile similar but with stronger rufous tones to the wings and orangish crown. Female and juvenile similar to female Asian Emerald Cuckoo or Little Bronze Cuckoo; look for combination of orange bill and patchy iridescent green instead of the Emerald’s unbroken sheen or Little Bronze’s dark bill and duller sheen.
Distribution and habitat
The violet cuckoo is found from north-eastern India to Southeast Asia, Greater Sundas, Palawan and the Philippines. Southern populations are resident, while northern populations in locations such as Assam and Bangladesh appear to be migratory.[2]

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is also seen in gardens,orchards, and rubber plantations. It occurs from lowlands up to 1500m, but mainly below 700m.[2]

The species is reported to be uncommon throughout its range. However, because it has a wide range, the species is not considered to be threatened by the IUCN.[3] However one source suggests that the species is threatened in areas of its range because of habitat loss.[2]

Behaviour
Violet cuckoos are insectivorous but they will also eat fruit. They have been seen shaking hairy caterpillars to remove the stomach contents for consumption.[4] They forage by creeping up and down branches, but they can also flycatch on the wing.[2]

Cuckoos are brood parasites and lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. The males are active and vocal during the breeding season in order to attract mates. Once they have mated, the females become secretive as they search for appropriate nests in which to lay their eggs.

Host species recorded for the violet cuckoo are sunbirds and spiderhunters (thirteen species of the genus Arachnothera, small birds related to sunbirds).[2] Host species often recognise adult cuckoos as a threat and chase them off, but then do not recognise that the cuckoo eggs in the nest are aliens. Cuckoo chicks are usually larger than host chicks. The chicks of many cuckoo species have been observed to throw the host chicks out of the nest, although this behaviour has not been recorded for the violet cuckoo yet.

Distribution and habitat
The violet cuckoo is found from north-eastern India to Southeast Asia, Greater Sundas, Palawan and the Philippines. Southern populations are resident, while northern populations in locations such as Assam and Bangladesh appear to be migratory.[2]

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is also seen in gardens,orchards, and rubber plantations. It occurs from lowlands up to 1500m, but mainly below 700m.[2]

The species is reported to be uncommon throughout its range. However, because it has a wide range, the species is not considered to be threatened by the IUCN.[3] However one source suggests that the species is threatened in areas of its range because of habitat loss.[2]

Behaviour
Violet cuckoos are insectivorous but they will also eat fruit. They have been seen shaking hairy caterpillars to remove the stomach contents for consumption.[4] They forage by creeping up and down branches, but they can also flycatch on the wing.[2]

Cuckoos are brood parasites and lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. The males are active and vocal during the breeding season in order to attract mates. Once they have mated, the females become secretive as they search for appropriate nests in which to lay their eggs.

Host species recorded for the violet cuckoo are sunbirds and spiderhunters (thirteen species of the genus Arachnothera, small birds related to sunbirds).[2] Host species often recognise adult cuckoos as a threat and chase them off, but then do not recognise that the cuckoo eggs in the nest are aliens. Cuckoo chicks are usually larger than host chicks. The chicks of many cuckoo species have been observed to throw the host chicks out of the nest, although this behaviour has not been recorded for the violet cuckoo yet.

Distribution and habitat
The violet cuckoo is found from north-eastern India to Southeast Asia, Greater Sundas, Palawan and the Philippines. Southern populations are resident, while northern populations in locations such as Assam and Bangladesh appear to be migratory.[2]
Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is also seen in gardens,orchards, and rubber plantations. It occurs from lowlands up to 1500m, but mainly below 700m.[2]

The species is reported to be uncommon throughout its range. However, because it has a wide range, the species is not considered to be threatened by the IUCN.[3] However one source suggests that the species is threatened in areas of its range because of habitat loss.[2]

Behaviour
Violet cuckoos are insectivorous but they will also eat fruit. They have been seen shaking hairy caterpillars to remove the stomach contents for consumption.[4] They forage by creeping up and down branches, but they can also flycatch on the wing.[2]

Cuckoos are brood parasites and lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. The males are active and vocal during the breeding season in order to attract mates. Once they have mated, the females become secretive as they search for appropriate nests in which to lay their eggs.

Host species recorded for the violet cuckoo are sunbirds and spiderhunters (thirteen species of the genus Arachnothera, small birds related to sunbirds).[2] Host species often recognise adult cuckoos as a threat and chase them off, but then do not recognise that the cuckoo eggs in the nest are aliens. Cuckoo chicks are usually larger than host chicks. The chicks of many cuckoo species have been observed to throw the host chicks out of the nest, although this behaviour has not been recorded for the violet cuckoo yet.

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Donnajames

Fantastic color. I guess all cuckoos are like that and do not rear their own babies. dj

Beautiful! Donna