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Unusual Red Barn With FENCE...

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  1. Hasli0:52
  2. emilym0:56
  3. Dclo0:57
  4. alansnell0:59
  5. LadyDonna11:01
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  7. Robbos1:03
  8. mariolyn1:03
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patsquire

Sounds like fun. Good luck.

redina1

Sounds like your hometown (or those that run it) is (are) a bit eccentric, or maybe just lousy at math. I notice the borough thing when I visited a friend near Philadelphia. Didn't understand it, but we were up there in the springtime, and I don't care what they call it, I just call it pretty. Sounds like your teacher could have been Pennsylvania Dutch, too, with a name like that. Loudenslager was originally spelled different. It evolved and there's at least three ways it can be spelled. (Loud, Laud, Laut... and maybe more.) I'm thinking she was on my grandpa's side of the family, because I can trace my mom's side to her great, great grandmother who I believe was an Atkins or something like that. I know nothing about my grandpa's ancestors. He died in 1970 at 61 years old. You are right, it is interesting, so I'll keep playing with it and try not to sign up for something I don't want to get involved with. :)

patsquire

Also I should add that Emmaus was founded with that spelling, but the Pennsylvania Dutch influence grew and grew so in the early 1800s the name was changed to the German spelling of Emaus. That lasted for 100 years, and in the 1930s it was changed back to Emmaus.

The pronunciation is just like the Biblical town of Emmaus after which it was named. But when I lived there, there were still plenty of Dutchmen around who liked the old way and pronounced it "E-mouse." In fact, I learned a lot more German than I realized living among them.

patsquire

Yes, Emmaus, PA has a strong interest in its history. But there's something funny going on there, which isn't important enough to worry about but it's still confusing and amusing to me. When I was a teenager in 1959 the town made a BIG DEAL of celebrating its sesquicentennial. That means 150th anniversary, and that's when I learned that word. In mid-summer I was part of a grand pageant on a Saturday night in the high school football stadium (I carried a spear) that culminated months of activities. My father grew a beard and joined something called the Dan Beard Society. The town had actual wooden nickels produced, which all the stores in town accepted as real money. The ladies all wore old fashioned costumes. It went on and on, and it was good for the town.

OK, 50 years later in 2009 Emmaus celebrated its 250th anniversary! (I don't know what the word for that is.) I called city hall and asked how Emmaus got 100 years older in just 50 years, and they gave me some gobbledygook line of reasoning which I couldn't follow and promptly forgot.

Now, I think that's FUNNY! Emmaus, PA, the town that aged 100 years from 1959 to 2009! (Actually Emmaus is a borough, not a town. Many towns in Pennsylvania are officially called boroughs. The Borough of Emmaus is what you'll see in official records.)

Now, more to the point. I got out my high school yearbook (1964) and discovered a slight case of misremembrance. The teacher I had was Mr. Leibensperger, not Loudenslager, but the reason the name rings a bell is that I had a classmate who graduated with me in 1964 named Ruth Ann Laudenslager. Note the slightly different spelling. She lived in our neighboring town of Macungie, PA. It's pronounced with a soft "gee" at the end. Ma-GUN-gee except that the middle part is CUN.

Anyway, helpful or not this has been fun!

redina1

@patsquire I've contacted a wonderful man from your hometown who referred me to a site that has opened up other doors into my ancestors. I don't know if we'll make it all the way to Loudenslager, but this is so interesting. Thank you for your input. Eastern Tennessee is beautiful and the people are so nice. I'm sure you are very happy there.

patsquire

I don't blame you for staying away from Ancestry.com. It sounds like they probably tell you what you want to hear and then string you along for "more research" until you finally quit paying.

Yes, the Lehigh Valley is just beautiful, and so fertile it's one of America's breadbaskets. I was lucky to grow up there, and out at the west edge of town where it was a short bike ride to the woods and steams. I live in eastern Tennessee now and it's similar in its beautiful countryside and rolling hills.

redina1

I just googled Emmaus. Small town look with beautiful countryside surrounding it. You live in a very nice area. Makes me wonder why a bunch of Pennsylvania Dutch would leave it and go to Kansas. Maybe I'll find that out in my searching.

redina1

Thanks, Pat. I just looked at it a little and will definitely dig deeper. My mom showed me a ring that her great great grandma Loudenslager had and told me I could have it after she was gone. We had no idea that in just two days mom would be gone and the ring would be mine. So, that's why I am interested in this lady. And I don't even know her first name. I'd rather not do the Ancestry thing, so I'm going to look on my own first. Is that where you are from? It's really pretty up there.

patsquire

Maybe! And maybe a lead to the Allentown, Lehigh Valley area to start your search.

redina1

Maybe a long lost relative of mine?

patsquire

I had Mr. Loudenslager as my freshman high school health teacher in 1960! Small world. Emmaus, Pennsylvania.

redina1

I'd love to attend a retreat like that Mariolyn. Pat, you mentioned Pennsylvania Dutch: I just found out my great, great, great grandmother was one by the name of Loudenslager. I'm very curious about them now and plan to do some research. This is a great barn. (Hi, dendro.)

patsquire

Nah, I meant pure gossip, of course! ☺ Sounds like a good thing for all the participants.

mariolyn

@patsquire
Our United Church has held a women's retreat for the past 10 years before Father's Day in June. We had 27 women this year, our largest group yet, and we filled the lodge. This year's theme was "Anxious for Nothing" Phil. 4:6 and there were 3 small group discussion sessions. Does that fit your definition of a "hen" party?

dbnc2

something different

patsquire

Welcome back! I'm wondering, is what you call a "ladies' retreat weekend" what we men call a ☺ ☺ ☺ hen party ☺ ☺ ☺ ?

mariolyn

The FENCE is a nice welcome back from our ladies' retreat weekend. THANKS.

dendro

Thanks for the great comment Pat, I've seen this style many places including here in Virginia, but the majority have been in Pennsylvania.

dendro

It appears it wouldn't take much to make that change indeed, Jill, but then we haven't seen the inside of it. It does have the look. Thanks

dendro

Thanks Ellen♥

patsquire

In the 18th and 19th centuries the Pennsylvania Dutch farmers build barns on a slope when they could. The stone supports were divided like this to create stalls underneath. I had a high school friend whose wealthy father bought such a farm in the 1960s. Building a barn like this gave many advantages in the days before electricity, not least of which was good drainage.

Her father soon bought a young steer to fatten up and butcher for steaks, roasts, loins, etc. He put him in one of the stalls under the back of the barn. My friend named him Dewey, and once Dewey had a name he became a pet, not a beef! Old Dewey lived a long and pampered life. I don't know how long steers live, but Dewey died of old age!

JillianB

Yes you are totally right dendro, just seems nice enough for people too.

PutterDutt

You picked a good'un, dendro. I love it when FB paints a picture in words of what can be done to preserve and improve these older lovlies!

dendro

I believe its a rel barn, Jill. If you look at the white square on the end of it, you can see the louvers of ventilator panels. Six doors long, make it a pretty big barn. Thanks

dendro

I've seen numerous of these barns in places where the ground is unlevel, HBL, and this would be more practical than digging the other far side into the ground. There is a name for this style of barn but I can't remember it now. But that is a large barn to support for sure.

dendro

And a nice ventilator, pasta.☺ Thanks

dendro

If it was a B&B, the second B(breakfast) would mean going out and collecting your own eggs and also vegetables from the garden. to bring to the kitchen for your fresh omelet. Thanks FB and Ellen.

JillianB

Wow this is a wonderful building. I presume animals can shelter under the building and even wonder if the top level is used for actually living in? Whatever it's a beauty thanks

humminbirdlvr

I would be curious to know why they built the barn on those stone supports? Looks like the center ones aren't holding up too well, caving in a little in the middle. Hope they can stop that deterioration before it goes any further.

pasta

Hi, dendro. This is a huge barn, great shape too. Love it. :)

Fingerbreaker

This would be a cracker of a barn for conversion to an inn. For starters, it's perched high on stilts. People love views. With this in mind, increase the dormer windows to six and make them bigger.
The dining and bar facilities can be on the right side of the barn, incorporated into the catslide area.
Good views from this side.
Beats a motel.

PutterDutt

I'll bet our friend Fingerbreaker could make a lovely inn out of this barn!

@Fingerbreaker
@mariolyn

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