Solve, create, share and talk about jigsaw puzzles

Scrub Turkey scratching in the back garden yesterday.

9pieces
26comments
134solves
Solve puzzle
The yellow part is called the 'Wattle' and becomes larger during the breeding season - September to March.

The species is communal, forming communal nests. A typical group consists of a dominant male, one or more younger males and several females. They build large nests on the ground made of leaves, other combustible material and earth, 1 to 1.5 metres high (3-4.5 ft.) and up to 4 m (13 ft.) across.
The eggs are hatched by the heat of the composting mound which is tended only by the males who regulate the temperature by adding or removing material in an effort to maintain the temperature of the mound in the 33–35°C (91-95°F) incubation temperature range. The Australian Brush or Scrub Turkey checks the temperature by sticking its beak into the mound.

Like some reptiles, incubation temperature affects the sex ratio of chicks.The sex ratio in Brush or Scrub Turkeys is equal at incubation temperatures of 34°C, but results in more males when cooler and more females when warmer. It is unclear whether the parents use this to manipulate the sex of their offspring by, for instance, selecting the nesting site accordingly. Warmer incubation also results in heavier, fitter chicks, but how this is linked to gender is unknown.

Excerpt from Wikipedia.

Comments

Add new comment
robryan

No Ami - these are a protected native bird, and I've never heard of any being eaten!! Apparently the Aboriginal people used to eat them decades ago, but I don't think they do now!!

loveydear

Are they on people's menus? Here turkeys are raised to be eaten, is that the case there too?

robryan

Thanks Don - They're a bit different from your turkeys:))

dondi

Good picture, and fascinating information.

robryan

Thanks Lorna - this one was only foraging for bugs etc - and was soon on his merry way!

Thanks snooker - probably more than you will ever need to know:)))

You should take a photo of him Lyndee - I'd like to see him!!

Thanks ikook - he certainly won't win ant beauty contests:))

Just a few bugs and maybe some bird seed Suzy!! Thanks!!

pumpkinhead

Hope he found something to eat while scratching about! Great shot of him, Robyn!

ikook

Good picture, Robyn, nice close up. No the Turkey is not very good looking, but it is very colourful. TFS!

lyndee

I have had a turkey in my back yard every morning for the past four days. He's all alone and very quietly struts his stuff!!!!

snooker

Learned a lot about turkeys here. Thank you.

goingsilver

He sure wouldn't win a beauty contest but at least he is fairly garden friendly, so long as Layla keeps her distance. Interesting info Rob thanks.

robryan

They sure are strange abel - but I think all turkeys are strange looking:)))) Thanks for dropping by to comment!!

abel

Terrific photo, robryan! Strange looking bird!!

robryan

They'd blend into the vegetation really well then Karlein - the yellow is easy to spot anywhere in the garden:))) Thanks!!!

KARLS

IT MAY NOT BE ATTRACTIVE BUT THE RARE ONES AROUND HERE DON'T HAVE COLOURING. AND LIKE YOU SAY ROBYN, THEY TAKE OFF QUICKLY, SO MUCH SO THAT MY DOG NEVER NOTICED IT.

robryan

Thanks Floyd - there's no chance of me getting scratched, as they take off when they see you! Layla cat is the one who sneaks up on them :)))

That's what I think too smllpkg:))) Butt-ugly and very much like a vulture:))) But...their diet is much more acceptable:)))Thanks!!!

smllpkg101

Not so attractive in this close-up. Reminds me of a vulture.

Gladstone

That is very interesting information.
The colors really show up in your photo.
Don't get scratched.
Thanks Rob.

robryan

Thanks Dave - that was news to me too - I knew that crocodile were affected that way, but not turkeys!! Thanks!!

They sure are Plumpie - thanks for dropping by!!

LOL! Very colourful Laura - but just his neck & head :))) Thanks!

Thanks Barb - it was news to me though - I just never thought about it actually:))) Thanks!!

Thanks Janet - they just stroll through looking for bugs!.......and get Layla and the Noisy Miners excited!! Layla chases them - and they fly up into the trees! but - I hope she never corners one, as they have a wicked set of claws!!! This one did a bit of scratching among the leaves & mulch - nothing too drastic, thank goodness!!! We've seen it about 3 times this week.

jan42ful

Fabulous pic, Rob. Do they do much damage to your garden? Great info too, thanks and hugs, janet.

Plumpossum, they are. My husband used to be in National Parks, and they discovered that moving the turtle eggs (which they do if a cyclone is coming) can change the sex! Hugs.

SunnyBarb25

Well, birds are not that far away from reptiles so I'm not surprised that the temperature in the nest affects the sex of the chicks, just like alligators and other reptiles...and dinosaurs...LOL Rob, I love you photo and your camera!

laurajane

He certainly is a colourful chap!

Plumpossum

I think sea turtles are similarly temperature sensitive. Amazing.

warbler

Thats amazing info in the description. Temps effecting sex of hatchlings. Amazing. Not just chromozones. Wonderful photo, Robyn!! Very nice!!

robryan

Thanks Patti!!!

LOL!! I do love my zoom Beekay - I guess I was about 6 metres away, and out of the rain:)))
We've had 1" - 26mm - of rain in the last 24 hours and it'd been terrific:))) Thanks!!

Beekay

Goodness Rob, any closer and he'll be pecking the lens on the camera LOL. Great photo!

PLG1958

Terrific photo, Robyn! Thanks!

Leaderboard

laurajane0:05
mamere0:06
Robbos0:07
goingsilver0:08
pumpkinhead0:08
loveydear0:08
NewSong0:09
abel0:09
snooker0:09
ikook0:09