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Pumpkin Swirl (Medium)

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Happy Halloween, everyone!!!!!!!

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whatnauts

:))))

pdevredis65

But when we came up with that name, there weren't any long-established countries in North or South America, the way there were in Europe, so who would have objected back then? And the word "America" came from Amerigo Vespucci, who recognized that the land mass wasn't part of Asia, but separate. So the whole thing became the New World, or America, and we eventually became the part called The United States of that area. As I just said, there weren't any other countries there for us to offend, except maybe Canada...

whatnauts

I don't know when the animosity started, but can you imagine a European country doing the same thing? Italy - United Provinces Of Europe, or Germany - United States Of Europe. Now that I think of it, it's almost like no one could come up with a country name they liked or everyone could agree on!

pdevredis65

Yes, when we use America to describe the army, we do make it possessive or whatever that form is called, which is why I only mentioned US! LOL! I always wonder just how long it took other nations to become annoyed at our usurpation of the word America. When we called ourselves that, were there really that many countries in Latin or South America that thought of themselves, or called themselves, American? Or did the animosity come later, maybe in the 20th century?.......

whatnauts

I've also heard it as the American army. But the problem with calling US people Americans is people from Canada, Mexico, Honduras are also Americans, not to mention Brazil, Venezuela, etc. Whoever named your country would have done better to leave off the 'Of America' part!! Although what you would have called your citizens is beyond me. But I digress. It's definitely because States ends in 's'. I've never thought it any more possessive than say, the Canadian army (hahaha - such as it is), or the British army.

pdevredis65

I sometimes wonder about another usage: people say "the United States [or U.S.] army", but "the French, British, etc. army", not "the France army". Is it because "United States" ends in an "s", so we hear it as a possessive? Hmmm....

whatnauts

Too right! Now that you mention it, of course I already new people don't say bank check (LOL - I automatically typed cheque and had to go back and change it!). I guess your using it that way made me wonder - I should have thought more about it.

Yes, most people do say THE hospital. Strange - that's for sure. Your question reminded me that just the other day I was thinking about a language curiosity, but I can't remember what it was - only that it was strange. Sometimes I really think dementia is setting in.....

pdevredis65

No, we don't use "bank", normally. I just mentioned it to make sure we were talking about the same thing. In stores, they ask if we're paying by cash, check (not bank check), or credit card, and the famous saying is "The check (again, not bank check) is in the mail", meaning "Good luck waiting for it!". It's no harder for us to figure out what kind of check we mean when we speak or write than it is for any other word that has multiple meanings--we go by context. We "give someone a ring" on the phone or when we propose marriage; a room gets booked in a hotel and a suspect gets booked in a police station; a person lights up, and in some contexts that means his face glows with joy, and in others, that he has used a match on a cigarette! LOL!

I don't know why you didn't also adopt the s for z--curious! And do you say: "He went to the hospital" or "He went to hospital"? I always wonder about things like that--we say "went to school/church/work", but "went to THE hospital".......

whatnauts

I guess because when I see the word check, I think of the other meanings of the word, whereas cheque immediately denotes money. I'm curious, do you (Americans) always use 'bank' in front of check when you are referring to a cheque?

I wonder why we never adopted the British use of s for z, since we use so many other British language idiosyncrasies (as in organisation).

pdevredis

Now I have to ask you, why does that make more sense than check? Bank check sounds fine to me.....

whatnauts

How about cheque??? Makes more sense me thinks..

pdevredis65

Thanks, whatnauts! I think I should start spelling it that way, too--I think it looks better, and it's a little more accurate! But you'll never get me to spell color with a u! LOL!

whatnauts

I love your pumpkin, PD! Happy Hallowe'en :))))))))

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